Decorative Type

Not that handy with the Pen Tool? But want a way to create the common swirls/flourishes trend objects. Here is a quick method.

Create Type Layer

Begin with a New > Document Preset of your choice. I used 500×500, White Background Contents at 72 Resolution.

Then add any type to the new document. As captured below, I used the word Rose
(Arial, Bold, 149pt)
Decorative Type with Liquify

Convert Type to Shape Layer

Next, Ctrl + Click (MAC:Command Click) directly onto the Type Layer (Rose) and from the context list choose Convert to Shape Layer as captured below.
Decorative Type with Liquify

The result will be as captured below, type converted to Shape Layer.
Decorative Type with Liquify

Filter > Liquify

Now with Shape 1 Layer Thumbnail active, go Filter > Liquify menu command.:

  1. Ctrl Click (MAC:Command Click) the Vector Mask Thumbnail to activate it as a selection.
  2. Then click the Add New Layer Mask icon command at the bottom of the Layers Panel.
  3. Ctrl Click (MAC:Command Click) on the Vector Mask Thumbnail and choose disable.
  4. You should now see a red x through the Vector Mask as captured below.

Decorative Type with Liquify Liquify – Twirl Clockwise Tool

 

  1. Activate the Twirl Clockwise Tool
  2. Set Brush Size/properties
  3. Then Press and hold along the edge to create auto twirls to the Mask

Click OK command to commit changes.
Decorative Type with Liquify Here is the final version.
Decorative Type with Liquify

Overflow Blending Styles on Type

A simple ‘tracking’ adjustment on type letters combined with Layer Blending Styles can produce a nice overflow style effect.

Create a new document preset (File/New) of your choice. Just ensure it’s large enough to contain a larger than normal type face Layer as detailed below.

  1. Activate the Type Tool (T).
  2. Set Options Bar Type Tool parameters.
  3. Click once on your document and type any two characters. I used the characters ‘3d’.
Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Next, Right Click (Mac:Ctrl + Click) on the new ‘3d’ Type Layer in the Layers Palette and choose Blending Options from the context list, as captured below.

Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Next:

  1. Tick the Drop Shadow Blending Style.
  2. Set Drop Shadow Structure options as captured below. I used a neutral grey for the color: #747373
Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Next:

  1. Tick the Gradient Overlay Style option.
  2. Set the options as captured below. I used ‘Orange, Yellow, Orange’ gradient preset.
  3. Click OK to commit Blending Styles.
Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Here is the document and Layers Palette preview thus far. Ultimately, the two blending styles in and of themselves are not crucial but are used to show the overflow effect in the next step.

Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Next:

  1. Make sure the 3d Type Layer is the Active Layer.
  2. Activate the Type Tool (T) from the Toolbar, if it already isn’t so.
  3. Toggle the Character/Paragraph Palette to the foreground.
  4. Alter the Tracking Individual Characters to a negative value until the letter d will push inwards, as captured in the direction of my arrow.
Overflow Blending Styles on Type

It’s a simple effect and can prove useful for logo experiments, either with letters, full words, Open Type ligatures or ding bats.

  1. With additional Stroke Blending Style applied.
  2. With Italic applied to just a single letter.
  3. Superscript applied to a single letter.
  4. Character Kerning applied to two characters.
Overflow Blending Styles on Type

Text Wrapping in Photoshop CS and CS2

Here is a great way to simulate text wrapping to your Paragraph type with full formatting just like a Page Layout editing program.

This tutorial utilise’s text on a path for CS and above and assumes some knowledge of Photoshop Paths.

As a preamble to this tutorial and understanding Text on a Path in Photoshop, the three below captures reveal the various options when the Type Tool is active (hoving) on a Path.

A. Clicking out side of the Path with the Type Tool active will simply just produce a new Type Layer (without a type on the Path)
B. Mouse Over and click ON the Path will attach your Type Layer ONTO the Path itself.
C. Mouse over and click INSIDE a Path will trap the Type Layer inside the Path.

Simulate Text Wrapping in PhotoshopSimulate Text Wrapping in PhotoshopSimulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Option C above, combined with Path Options Bar modifier features will produce the following result.
The below image simply captures text wrapping around a graphic with uninterrupted flowing from left to right.

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

To begin, simply place a graphic element in the middle of your document, as I have captured below. (My graphic is a multi-layered Smart Object)

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Next: (Items captured below)
A. Select the Rectangle Shape Tool from the Toolbar.
B. Activate the Paths Options bar feature for this Rectangle Shape Tool.
C. Enable ‘Add to Shape Area’ modifier feature for this active Rectangle Shape Tool.
D. Then click and drag from the upper left to lower right of your document.
Doing so will create a closed rectangular path outline, as captured below.

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Next: (Items captured below)
A. Select the Ellipse Shape Tool from the Toolbar.
B. Activate the Paths Options bar feature for this Rectangle Shape Tool.
C. Enable ‘Subtract to Shape Area’ modifier feature for this active Rectangle Shape Tool.
D. Then click and drag over the underlying graphic area as I have captured below.

Important: Ensure that the new Ellipse path touches/intersects the previously drawn Rectangular path, highlighted in green below.

Note: What this step is doing is simply cutting a hole in the original Rectangular path, as indicated by the Paths thumbnail via the Paths Palette. (Lower right)

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Finally: (Items captured below)
A. Select the Type Tool from the Toolbar.
B. Mouse over inside the original Rectangular Path (notice the cursor change – encased in red below)

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Click once, and the type insertion cursor will be blinking in the upper right corner on the inside of the path, as captured below.

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Type a few paragraph’s or copy/paste from another source and watch the text wrap around the image, as I have finalized below.

Simulate Text Wrapping in Photoshop

Additionally, open the ‘Window/Paragraph’ Palette and apply various text formatting.

If you are familiar with the Pen Tool, there are endless possibilities here to creating irregular paragraph type areas that simulate text wrapping.

Open Type Features in Photoshop CS

A new feature to the designers world (though some features were introduced as earlier as Photoshop 6) is the OpenType font standard jointly developed by Adobe & Microsoft.

This tutorial will just be an introduction to some of the great features and benefits to using OpenType fonts.

Benefits of OpenType:
1. Combines PostScript 1 & TrueType into a single font
2. Takes advantage of Unicode character encoding
3. A single cross platform font between PC & Macintosh computers

Adobe Creative Suite ships with over 100 of these OpenType fonts and as a beginning point to this OpenType introduction I will focus on the ‘Adobe Calso Pro’ font.

Note:
OpenType fonts with Central European (CE) language support are the ones that have the ‘Pro’ suffix.
Non CE supported OpenType fonts are labelled Standard (Std) suffix.

Let’s begin with a single example of how this is useful in Photoshop.
Go Window/Character, to open the Character Palette as I have captured below.

Change the Arial font type to Adobe Calso Pro as I have captured below.

This is where the full advantage of OpenType fonts occur. Select, the Character Palette menu command and notice down towards the bottom the extra glyph features available to this font.

There is often a broader range of ‘Font Styles’ to choose from asI have captured below.

Select ‘Ordinals’ from the Glyphs list and it’s easy to create numbered superscripts as I have captured below.

Select ‘Ornaments’ from the Glyphs list and the current font style is transformed into ornate symbols as I have captured below.
The below two lines use the same letters ‘OpenType’. The first line uses the Regular Font Style while the second line uses the Ornament glyph substitute.

Select ‘Fractions’ from the Glyphs list and it’s easy to transform numeric fractions into its proper form, as I have captured below.

Change the ‘Font Style’ from ‘Regular’ to ‘Italic’ and from the Glyph list choose ‘Swash’ as I have captured below.

This is a just a few items of interest into using OpenType fonts and certainly there are plenty of other variations worth exploring.
For complete coverage of the glph variants for this font visit here for details.
For troubleshooting and commonly asked questions visit the Adobe Typography User to User forum.

Spell Check Multiple Type Layers

A handy feature in Photoshop is the Spell Check option for type layers.
It can be used for a single type layer, a single word, but also for multiple type layers at once.

Below is an example of two separate Paragraph type layers and in each paragraph is an intended misspell, to put Photoshop to the test.
You can also test this yourself.

Spell Check multiple=

Before we begin, open the ‘Window/Character’ palette and towards the bottom choose your Language Dictionary preference to check the spelling against, as I have captured below.

Spell Check multiple=

With a Type Layer active, as in the above example, next go to ‘Edit/Check Spelling…’ menu command, as I have captured below.

Spell Check multiple=

It immediately picked up my first of two spell errors.

Make sure the ‘Check All Layers’ is ticked towards the bottom as I have encased in red below.
Proceed to correct by typing it into the ‘Change To’ field or select it from the ‘Suggestions’ list.

Spell Check multiple=

Photoshop proceeds and picked up the second of two spell errors and found a correct suggestion from the list.

Click the ‘Change’ command option…

Spell Check multiple=

…and Photoshop prompts me that ‘Spell Check is Complete’.

Certainly, a great feature for multiple text blocks and a good proof reading dosn’t hurt before passing your comp onto the client.

 

Spiral Text On A Path in Photoshop CS

A follow up from the Type on a Path introduction, here is a simple way to add text to a spiral path.

Start a new document. Your preset choice.

Select either the Custom Shape Tool from the Toolbar.
Then go to the Options Bar and select the ‘All’ Palette Option from the Shape Preset Picker Manager, as I have captured below.

Text On A Spiral Path in Photoshop CS

Provided you still have just the default shapes intact as I do, the Spiral Shape should be located midway down lower right as I have captured below.
Double click it, to select it.
Then ensure ‘Paths’ Options bar feature is enabled. (Encased in red upper left of below screen shot)

Text On A Spiral Path in Photoshop CS

With the Custom Shape Tool (U) still active, click and drag (Hold Shift key to constrain proportion) to create the path as I have captured below.

Text On A Spiral Path in Photoshop CS
As in the previous Type on a Path introduction, select the Type Tool (T), position your insertion point and type, as in the below example.
Tip: Ctrl+H (Mac: Command+H) to Hide the spiral path from view.
Text On A Spiral Path in Photoshop CS

Pre CS user will find these alternative fake text on a path methods helpful.
Circular Text: Using Vector Mask
Circular (Edit able) Text: Simplified